E.T., the Extra-Terrestrial is extra-terrible as a book

Space craft barely visible in night sky on cover of E.T. The Extra-Terrestrial
Space craft barely visible in night sky

Making a movie version of a great book rarely turns out well. If E.T. the Extra-Terrestrial, is anything to go by, turning a great movie into a book is a disaster.

Even people who didn’t see the movie know the general outline of the story: A being from outer space who comes to earth to gather botanical samples, misses the space ship trip home, and is befriended by an American kid, 10-year-old Elliott Thomas.

E.T. gets Elliott and the other two Thomas children, Gertie and Michael, to get him the additional parts he needs to build a transmitter from the Speak and Spell so he can contact his space ship and arrange to go home.

The entry of an UFO into American airspace hasn’t gone unnoticed.

All the resources of America’s government are on the trail of the extra-terrestrial.

They’re no match for the juvenile Dungeons & Dragons fans on bicycles who rush E.T. to the landing site just in time to catch his return flight.

The movie’s special effects made the silly story an entertaining fantasy suitable for children of all ages.

The book renders the story too ridiculous for any reader.

(The website cracked.com ranks E.T. one of the five worst movie-into-book translations of all time.)

E.T., the Extra-Terrestrial
by William Kotzwinkle. Based on
the screenplay by Melissa Mathison
G. P. Putnams. © 1988.  246 p.
1981 bestseller #1. My grade C

©2019 Linda G. Aragoni