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Quote from Roger Gale: "There's to be nothing startling in this quiet house of mine."

Roger Gale came to New York at 17 from New Hampshire looking for a business he could turn into the American dream.

He made it happen. He also married.


His Family by Ernest Poole
MacMillan, 1917. 1917 bestseller #7. Project Gutenberg ebook #14396. My grade A-.

Three daughters and 20 years later, Judith died, leaving Roger “deaf and blind to his children.”

Another 20 years later, Roger is emerging from his emotional deadness. His daughters seem foreign.

When Judith had told him before she died, “You will live on in our children’s lives,” Roger hadn’t believed her.

Slowly he sees that his children take after him, for better and for worse.

Edith is prim, controlling, totally absorbed in her husband and three children.

Deborah mothers 3,000 children. She’s principal of a school in the tenements that’s drawing national notice as a community educational center.

Laura is “a spender and a speeder,” with morals as skimpy as her clothes.

The sisters irritate one another and, in varying degrees, their father.

World War I starts.

Life happens.

So does death.

Ernest Poole’s characters are vivid, complicated, and annoyingly human.

Their life-changing events are pretty ordinary.

Their self-awareness is as dull as most everyone else’s, their influence as modest as most everyone else’s.

That’s why His Family feels real 100 years after its first publication.

© 2017 Linda Gorton Aragoni

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I don’t often find a book that I want to buy for my own collection, but I found one in So Well Remembered.

It’s a novel that bears re-reading.


So Well Remembered by James Hilton

Little, Brown 1945. 328 pages. 1945 bestseller # 7. My Grade: A.


On Sept. 1, 1921 as the Great War ends, Browdley Mayor George Boswell sees the foundation stone laid for the slum-clearance project so dear to his heart.

That evening George learns his wife wants to marry a budding young diplomat she met in Austria.

George gives Livia a divorce and throws himself into local politics with renewed vigor.

Twenty years later, George meets Livia’s son, Charles, a badly wounded flyer. George and Charles become close friends, forcing George to face his past — and Livia — again.

Livia is either criminally selfish or certifiably insane. Given her history, both are equally possible.

Incorruptible and totally without rancor, George will work as long as it takes to provide decent housing, good schools and medical care in Browdley — even if the town doesn’t want those things.

In So Well Remembered, James Hilton produced a gem whose plot, characters, insight, optimism, and humor more than atone for the sentimental drivel of his more famous novels.

I hope you’ll like So Well Remembered as much as I do.

© 2015 Linda Gorton Aragoni

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