Red Storm Rising

 tiny submarine is almost hidden by black and white type on red background
A submarine is under the title

In Red Storm Rising, Tom Clancy imagines a situation in which Cold War Era Russia finds itself an oil shortage for at least a couple years.

The Politboro sees its only option is to seize the oil in the Persian Gulf in such a way that the NATO alliance will be afraid to retaliate.

It devises an invasion of Europe in hopes that the military action will conceal their need for oil.

After setting up that scenario in about 30 pages, Clancy goes for nearly 600 more pages about a month of fighting—particularly the submarine warfare—between the Soviet and NATO Alliance members.

The novel repeatedly cycles through a huge, cast of predominantly male characters whose work is their lives.

They watch screens, listen to beeps, and say things like, “The sonobuoys have our torp but nothing else,” “Dead in the water,” and “Roger that.”

In the novel’s final post-war scene, the American General asks the Russian General, “Why didn’t you tell us you needed oil? … We would have demanded and gotten concessions of some kind—but don’t you think we would have tried to prevent all this?”

Similarly, Red Star Rising isn’t worth the effort expended by author and readers.

Red Storm Rising by Tom Clancy
Putnam, © 1986. 652 p.
1986 bestseller #2; my grade: C

©2019 Linda G. Aragoni