Hollywood Husbands: the novel

a car key is single art element on front cover
A car key is caught on the Ls

Hollywood Husbands is a Jackie Collins novel, which means it’s about sex among the rich, powerful, and glamorous.

Here the setting is the entertainment industry.

The Hollywood husbands are two currently married jerks and one divorced jerk-in-rehab.

The two currently married jerks, once-divorced actor Mannon Cable and three-times-divorced film studio head Howard Solomon, haven’t a brain between them.

The only one of the three husbands who seems to have an ounce of sense is Jack Python, host of a top-rated television interview show.

Divorced once, Jack is in a sexual relationship with an Oscar-winning actress who he’d just as soon drop.

When model Jade Johnson, who is supposedly as smart as she is beautiful, comes to Hollywood to pose for a TV commercial, she gets sucked into the cesspool in which the husbands, wives, and their exes swim.

Collins doesn’t try to make any of three husbands interesting.

Instead, Collins focuses on daytime soaps megastar Silver Anderson’s marriage to an ex-bartender. Poor Wes had the misfortune to walk off with a gun and thousands of dollars belonging to the mob.

Hollywood Husbands serves up more than you want to know about people you wouldn’t want to know at all.

Hollywood Husbands by Jackie Collins
Simon and Schuster, ©1986. 543 p.
1986 bestseller #5; my grade: C-

©2019 Linda G. Aragoni

Roper’s Row Is Clear-Eyed Romance

Roper’s Row is an engaging romance about a brilliant doctor who finds love on his doorstep and tries to step around it.

Christopher Hazzard works his way through medical school, hoping to do medical research. Socially, Kit finds medical school as unfriendly as grammar school. He is mocked for his lame foot and hated for his brilliant mind.

A romantic young woman rooming in the same house with Kit takes an interest in him. Ruth Avery is hard working, clean living. Kit hardly notices her until she get sick.

Ruth attempts suicide when vicious rumors of an illicit relationship kill Kit’s chance of a hospital appointment. Kit responds by marrying her: She’s a really good housekeeper.

Secure in the marriage, Ruth flourishes. She scrimps and saves, looking for a way to provide Kit with enough income to allow him to do research. She mothers Kit until a crisis makes him realize she’s not his mother.

Warwick Deeping freshens the humdrum plot by letting Kit and Ruth mature without transforming them into ways that deny their roots. Kit and Ruth come to love and respect each other, but Kit remains for the most part an emotional isolate. With his background, anything else is impossible.

Roper’s  Row
By Warwick Deeping
Alfred A. Knopf, 1929
365 pages
1929 bestseller # 5
My Grade: B+

© 2009 Linda Gorton Aragoni