The Klone and I

string of golden paper dolls; heart is dot on the I in the titleIt’s possible that I’m reading The Klone and I all wrong, but I prefer to think Danielle Steel decided she couldn’t write another syrupy romance and decided to spoof the whole business. At any rate, her Klone is one of the funniest novels I’ve read in a long time.

The story is related by a woman named Stephanie whose husband tells her in the 13th year of their marriage that he wants out.  She gets the kids, ages eight and 13. Roger gets alimony and quickly remarries.

Stephanie meets a lot of losers before she meets Peter Baker, an attractive divorce who runs a bionics company. Bionics is not a term Stephanie recognizes.

They slip into a relationship, though Stephanie’s kids think Peter is dull.

When Peter has to go to California on business, he promises her a surprise. The surprise is Paul Klone, a partially-cloned, partially bionic figure—read that as  life-size sex doll—that looks exactly like Peter, only much, much flashier.

Stephanie’s kids think Paul is great.

And Steel gives him great lines like, “I love you Steph . . . you make my wires hurt,” and his whine, “In a few hours, I’ll have my head off again, and all my wires hanging out, and you’ll be back with [Peter].”

The Klone and I: A High-Tech Love Story
by Danielle Steel
Delacorte ©1998. 231 p.
1998 bestseller #7; my grade: A

©2020 Linda G. Aragoni