Biological clock ticks, alarms in Soundings

From age 8 until Curley kisses her, Nancy Hawthorne’s artist father is her teacher, mentor, and companion.

Though Nancy doesn’t want Curley, she knows she wants passionate love.


Soundings: A Novel by A. Hamilton Gibbs

Little, Brown, 1925. 320 pages. 1925 bestseller #1. My grade: B.


To divert her, Jim suggests art study on the Continent.

In Paris, Nancy shares a flat with an American. Cordelia introduces Nancy to her brother, Lloyd, and Lloyd’s best friend at Oxford, Bob Whittaker.

Foot of week-old baby

Nancy likes Lloyd but falls hard for Bob. He appears to reciprocate.

When her father is injured in an accident, Nancy rushes back home to Brimble.

Bob doesn’t write.

When Nancy goes to Oxford to find out what’s changed, she finds Bob with another woman.

Nancy devotes herself to painting and to her father, now a paraplegic.

On her 27th birthday, in the midst of World War I, Nancy realizes she wants children. Lloyd’s death in France ends possibility of him as a husband.

Then a changed Bob is temporarily stationed in Brimble.

A. Hamilton Gibbs writes passages of absolutely beautiful prose but leaves gaping holes in character development.

Although the other characters are shown in varied situations, Gibbs rarely shows Bob when he’s not pursuing Nancy. Thus the ending of Soundings leaves a vague sense of distrust that Bob has fundamentally changed.

© 2015 Linda Gorton Aragoni

 Photo credit: Babyfoot by johnnyberg @ FreeImages.com

Take Chances Without Thinking

If you don’t look too closely, A. Hamilton Gibb’s 1930 bestseller, Chances, is a heart-warming tale of love between brothers.

Tom and Jack Ingleside are 15 and 13½ respectively when they are packed off to boarding school in France to crack their British insularity.  Until they are finished at Oxford and launched on their careers, the brothers share everything.

Then both boys fall for Molly Prescott, a Paris-educated artist they knew as children. Neither brother is aware of the other’s interest in her. After a squabble with Jack, Molly accepts Tom.

The brothers go off to war.

On leave from France, Jack and Molly reunite. When Tom learns his fiancee has left him for his brother, he refuses to even speak to Jack.

When the push comes, however, Tom proves blood is thicker than water.

Beneath the melodrama, the plot won’t hold up. It is incredible that two boys nearly as close as twins can both be madly in love and neither have an inkling of the other’s feelings.

Apparently the continental education didn’t achieve its aim. The boys developed good accents, but remained emotionally insulated when it comes to the most basic of human relationships.

Chances
by A. Hamilton Gibbs
Little, Brown,1930
285 pages
1930# 8
My grade: B

© 2010 Linda Gorton Aragoni