The Tenth Insight (novel)

lush, romantic forest scene with waterfall and lakeIn The Tenth Insight, James Redfield picks up the religious adventure he began in The Celestine Prophesy.

Seeking a friend who has disappeared, Nameless Narrator arrives at a small Appalachian village outside a national forest in time to make eye contact with a man he sees walking away from him.

Nameless follows the man.

Something bad is happening in the forest. An energy company is trying to develop a new, clean energy source and get a monopoly on it.

Nameless realized there is a one-time opportunity to change the world if cheap energy can be made available to everyone in the world. A handful of good guys band together to prevent the company from getting a monopoly.

Easier said than done. There are armed guards around the site.

Even after the good guys have “cleared [their] residual emotions and amplified [their] energy and shared [their] Birth Visions,” they still haven’t “seen the World Vision.”

Their energy is almost totally deflated, but eventually they are able to “lift the whole valley to a higher vibratory pattern.”

Readers may want to wait for a movie version of The Tenth Insight. Imagine the thrill of seeing Robert Downey Jr. tell Don Cheadle, “Find the World Vision and resolve the polarization.”

The Tenth Insight: Holding the Vision
Further Adventures of the Celestine Prophesy
By James Redfield
Warner Brooks. ©1996. 236 p.
1996 bestseller #10; my grade: D

©2020 Linda G. Aragoni

Hilton’s Lost Horizon dead loss to literature

Lost Horizon‘s only contribution to literature was make Shangri-La synonymous with paradise on earth, thereby providing a name for raunchy bars.

James Hilton’s novel is just plain stupid.


Lost Horizon by James Hilton

William Morrow, 1934. 277 pages. 1935 bestseller # 8. My grade C-.


Cover of Lost Horizon shows Shangri La clinging to mountainsidesHilton presents Lost Horizon as a second-hand tale, a device that’s supposed to relieve the teller of responsibility for veracity. However, the story is so ridiculous, the characters so implausible, that it could be plausible only to British school chums who topped off an old school dinner with plenty of brandy.

The novel is about four people whose plane goes down in the Himalayas: Conway, a British consul; Mallison, his youthful vice-consul; Roberta Brinkow, a missionary; and Henry Barnard, an American fugitive.

Monks take them into Shangri-La, a Tibetan valley where people life very long lives.

The monks pick Conway to become High Llama when the current leader snuffs it. All but Mallison would be content to stay put.

Mallison scorns Conway’s story that Lo-Tsen, the girl he’s fallen for in Shangri-La,  is really an old woman.

Love and duty demand he get back to England.

Conway leads the pair get out.

Does Lo-Tsen really age overnight?

Does Mallison see his folly?

Can Conway ever get back to Shangri-La?

Does anyone outside a raunchy bar know — or care?

© 2015 Linda Gorton Aragoni