Scarlett by Alexandra Ripley

On cover, Scarlett has top billing over Gone with the Wind
She reminds me of Heidi the Goat Girl.

Alexandra Ripley’s Scarlett’s full title adds the words, “The sequel to Margaret Mitchell’s Gone with the Wind.

Ripley picks up Scarlett O’Hara Hamilton Kennedy Butler’s story at the graveside of Melanie Wilkes, whose husband Scarlett had long coveted, letting readers know that episode is closed.

Then Ripley moves to Mammy’s death bed, where Rhett Butler appears to promise the faithful black servant he’ll look after Scarlett. Rhett says his promise is a lie, but Scarlett doesn’t believe that.

For the next 800 pages, Ripley moves Scarlett around the still Yankee-occupied South like a monopoly marker, sometimes landing on Boardwalk, sometimes not passing Go.

Scarlett keeps trying to get Rhett back. They have intercourse once, after which Rhett marries someone else. Later Scarlett discovers she’s pregnant.

After being introduced to her father’s relatives, Scarlett invests in land in Ireland, becoming The O’Hara of her father’s people under English domination.

Scarlett’s daughter Katie “Cat” O’Hara is a prodigy. By age four she is more mature than her mother at 30. Katie learns from her experiences: Scarlett never does.

Rhett’s wife conveniently dies, he conveniently comes to Ireland, and he and Scarlett are conveniently reunited.

The sequel spawned a TV miniseries. Even that caused no stir in this century.

Scarlett: Sequel to Margaret Mitchell’s Gone with the Wind
by Alexandra Ripley
Warner Books. 1991. 823 p.
1991 bestseller #1; my grade: C

©2020 Linda G. Aragoni

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Linda Aragoni

I read. I write. I think. I make big ideas simple for learners. I help teachers teach expository writing to teens and adults. In my free time, I read and review old novels.

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