Mitla Pass: a novel by Leon Uris

“Mitla Pass” cover is all text; the story’s too complex for a picture.The first chapter of Mitla Pass suggests the novel will be a war story.

What Leon Uris delivers is a story of the personal war of writer Gideon Zadok, a man with “the soul of a poet, the rage of a lion.”

Gideon has spent this entire life doing battle against his father, his mother, his wife, the publishing industry, and everyone and everything else that failed to value him.

Uris excavates Gideon’s past. He uncovers stories of people Gideon thinks let him down, flicking a flashlight into Russian shetetls, American slums, Hollywood studios, and Israeli strategy sessions.

Readers see all those individuals in a far more nuanced way than Gideon ever sees them.

For all his literary sensitivity, Gideon is incapable of seeing other people’s perspectives on any subject that affects him personally.

As the novel nears its end, Uris gets Gideon to the 1956 Sinai War foreshadowed in the opening chapter.

The battle for Mitla Pass is short, bloody, futile.

The book ends with Gideon’s wife wondering if their marriage will survive, while beside her, Gideon dreams that he’s going to make people proud of him.

Mitla Pass by Leon Uris
Doubleday. ©1988. 435 p.
1988 bestseller #10; my grade: A

©2019 Linda G. Aragoni

Published by

Linda Aragoni

I read. I write. I think. I make big ideas simple for learners. I help teachers teach expository writing to teens and adults. In my free time, I read and review old novels.

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