One (a Richard Bach novel)

gold mobius strip against blue sky is background art for “One”
The mobius strip is symbolic

One is a novel by Richard Bach, best known for his fable for adults, Jonathan Livingstone Seagull, in which the author proved to the gullible that, with determination and practice, anyone could be anything.

In One, adroitly subtitled “a novel” to keep people from thinking it is nonfiction, Bach fictionalizes his philosophical position that everything is an illusion.

One opens with the real Bach and his real wife, Leslie, flying to the real city of Los Angeles.

On the way to LA, the landscape below disappears. The couple drop into another dimension in which time is timeless and choices are limitless.

The couple take off and land to meet the selves they would be if they had lived in other times and other places and made other choices: They might never have met!

Bach and his wife come across as having the personalities of Popsicle sticks.

Bach’s philosophical discussion is on a par with his characterization skills. It doesn’t take an Einstein to know that living in a different century in a different place you’d have different choices, or that making different decisions results in different outcomes.

The Bachs divorced in 1997, which just goes to show the value of having alternative realities.

One: a novel by Richard Bach
Silver arrow books series
W. Morrow. ©1988. 1st.ed. 284 p.
1988 bestseller #9; my grade: C-

©2019 Linda G. Aragoni

Published by

Linda Aragoni

I read. I write. I think. I make big ideas simple for learners. I help teachers teach expository writing to teens and adults. In my free time, I read and review old novels.

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