Leaving Home by Garrison Keillor

Roadside sign says houses in distance are Lake WobegonLeaving Home is a collection of Garrison Keillor’s Prairie Home Companion monologues about Lake Wobegon, the little town on the edge of the Minnesota prairie “where all the women are strong, all the men are good looking, and all the children are above average.”

Leaving Home doesn’t make any attempt at a plot. It’s simply a collection of literary oddments.

The chapters are short, usually three to five pages, often funny, and vibrating with the ring of oral stories about small town people from mid-century mid-America.

People who grew up in any rural community in America after World War II will recognize the traits that Keillor alternately mocks and lauds.

These are church-going people, with or without personal faith, but with a strong commitment to what their church represents.

They aren’t rich or famous. Some are comfortable, others not so much.

All of them wonder what the world is coming to.

The book will bring joy to fans of Keillor’s down-home style of yarn-spinning.

Leaving Home should also have a strong attraction for depressed 21st century readers wondering what the world is coming to, and yearning for models of how to live among those with whom you disagree without being disagreeable.

Leaving Home: A Collection of
Lake Wobegon Stories
by Garrison Keillor
Viking. ©1987. 244 p.
1987 bestseller #5; my grade: B+

©2019 Linda G. Aragoni

Published by

Linda Aragoni

I make big ideas simple for learners. My program for turning teens and adults into competent writers is just eight sentences, 34 words.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.