Jailbird: An oddball in dark places

Title page of Jailbird shows a yellow bird sitting a a tea cup.
The bird, a prothononotary warbler appears in the novel.

Jailbird is not what you’d expect from Kurt Vonnegut’s fertile imagination.

Jailbird is a fictional memoir combining a few oddball characters with a raft of real characters who commit immoral and criminal acts in public places.

Jailbird’s fictional narrator, Walter F. Starbuck, can do nothing right, even when he follows good advice.

The son of immigrant employees of a millionaire industrialist who sends him to Harvard, Walter holds a federal job until he inadvertently betrays a friend and is fired.

Walter’s wife to support him.

Walter finally gets work again in the Nixon administration, where he gets caught in the Watergate scandal and goes to jail.

Released in 1977, he goes to New York where he unlawfully fails to reveal a will  and soon is on his way back to jail.

Vonnegut cannot avoid including a few laugh-out-loud wise cracks and off-beat perspectives on ordinary life, but on the whole Jailbird is a dark novel.

Vonnegut uses the fictional Walter to examine the real history of labor relations in the U.S., the Sacco and Vanzatti trial, the McCarthy investigations of subversive elements, and the unequal distribution of wealth in America.

Vonnegut’s Walter, when asked why he concerns himself with the working class responds, “Why? The Sermon on the Mount, sir.”

Jailbird by Kurt Vonnegut
Delacorte Press/Seymour Lawrence, ©1979. 246 p.
1979 bestseller #5 My grade: B

©2018 Linda Gorton Aragoni

 

Published by

Linda Aragoni

I make big ideas simple for learners. My program for turning teens and adults into competent writers is just eight sentences, 34 words.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.