“The Pretenders” begins with a death, then decays.

Author Gwen Davis
Author Davis looking dazzled.

Reviewers typically refer to The Pretenders as trash fiction and jump into a discussion of how another of Gwen Davis’s novels landed her in a libel suit some years later.

Davis herself described The Pretenders as “a dazzling novel of the beautiful people.”

I failed to be dazzled.

The dead man whose funeral is the social event that kicks of the novel is a rich, ruthless Hollywood producer. Mourners come to impress other mourners—no one had any respects to pay— and to see if there’s any way they can profit from Harry Bell’s death.

Davis’s “beautiful people” are losers with more money than brains and more ego than money.

The novel has a huge cast of characters playing unmemorable roles badly. There’s a lot of sex, little plot, and nothing that is either worth remembering or memorable.

The Pretenders is the only one of the nearly 70 years of bestsellers I read for this blog that I wasn’t able to finish. I gave up somewhere around page 200, and I refuse to try again.

John Ashley Nail read the entire book and has  intelligent  comments about it on Amazon.

The Pretenders by Gwen Davis
World Publishing, 1969. 512 p. My grade: D-

© 2017 Linda G. Aragoni

 

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Linda G. Aragoni

I make big ideas simple for learners. In eight sentences, 34 words, I taught teens and adults to write competently. Now I'm writing guides to turn willing volunteers into great nursing home visitors.

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