Airport by Arthur Hailey: Details matter

runway is central element on dust jacket of AirportI read Airport in two big gulps two days ago.

Tonight I can scarcely remember the plot or the characters’ names, but the details are still vivid.

In Airport, Arthur Hailey weaves together several plots whose characters happen to be in a particular place, just as he did in Hotel.

In this case, the scene is the fictitious Lincoln International Airport in the overnight hours during a blizzard.

The story focuses primarily on Mel Bakersfeld, the airport’s general manager, who has a rocky marriage, a brother whose air controller job is pushing him toward suicide, and an aging airport no longer capable of meeting the demands of aviation in the post-JFK era.

Hailey works in a couple of plots, one quite implausible, to make the point that airports are dangerously inadequate from a safety perspective.

Hailey tackles the stereotypes about pilots and stewardesses with a story line about one such duo for whom Hailey can’t seem to muster much liking.

What Hailey does marvelously, however, is relay the nuts-and-bolts details of the unseen jobs — the maintenance crews, the ticket counter staff, the air traffic controllers — so readers feel like they are looking over their shoulders as they work.

Airport is worth reading just for that.


Airport by Arthur Hailey
Doubleday, 1968. 440 p. 1968 bestseller #1. My grade: B.

© 2017 Linda Gorton Aragoni

 

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Linda Aragoni

I read. I write. I think. I make big ideas simple. I help teachers teach expository writing to teens and adults. In my free time, I read and review old novels.

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