To-morrow Morning examines time and opportunity

When Kate Starr leaves art school to marry handsome Joseph Green, she plans to go on with her painting.

Though they are poor, Joe with his financial ability and social skills is destined for great things.


To-morrow Morning by Anne Parish
Harper & Brothers, 1927. 305 pp. 1927 bestseller #8. My grade:B+.

female art student sketching, about 1900
Student in turn of the century art class.

Before long Joe is handling investments for his wealthy Aunt Sarah.

Kate would like to paint, but there’s never time in her married life.

Within five years, Joe is dead.

Kind creditors tell Kate that Joe paid his bills before his death, and Aunt Sarah kindly refrains from mentioning her reduced finances are due to Joe’s get-rich-quick investments.

Just as Kate’s life had revolved around Joe, now it revolves around their son, Jodie.

Like his mother, Jodie has an artistic bent; like her, he’s not disciplined enough to pursue it.

Anne Parrish builds the plot the way an impressionist builds a portrait. Her characters are well-defined by a tiny bits of information slipped into the story in seemingly off-hand ways, by indirection and innuendo. If readers’ attention lags, they can miss some fact vital to the plot.

Mother and son each become aware of the other’s strengths and weaknesses, but they never share their insights.

Kate and Jodie never realize today is yesterday’s tomorrow.

©2017 Linda Gorton Aragoni

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Linda Aragoni

I read. I write. I think. I make big ideas simple. I help teachers teach expository writing to teens and adults. In my free time, I read and review old novels.

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