The Thinking Reed not worth a second thought

Rebecca West took her 1936 novel title from Pascal’s Pensées in which he says man is only a feeble reed, but a thinking reed, ennobled by knowing that he will die.

West’s Isabelle certainly knows she will die; that fact is quite possibly the only thing she does know.

The Thinking Reed by Rebecca West

© 1936, 1964. Compass Books ed., 1961. Paper, 431 pp. 1936 bestseller #8. My grade C-.

cover of 1961 paperback edition of Rebecca West's The Thinking Reed shows cherubic statue holding flowersIsabelle is a beautiful, rich, young widow, on the loose in Paris between the wars.

Isabelle prides herself on her thinking—she spends some time every day thinking—and on her rejection of impulse.

Isabelle decides to drop a lover who brings out her impulsive side and marry a thinker, but the cerebral guy she’d like to marry thinks she’s too emotional.

Isabelle rebounds and marries industrialist Marc Sallafranque the next week.

Marc is good in bed and good at making money, so Isabelle tolerates his deficiencies in the thinking department.

Eventually her toleration turns to love, and the book ends.

Isabelle’s thought processes are every bit as ridiculous as those of George Brush in Thornton Wilder’s Heaven’s My Destination, but West takes her ridiculous character seriously.

As one reviewer quoted on the back cover says, The Thinking Reed is “among the best novels in the short memory of modern man.”

The shorter your memory, the better this novel is.

©2016 Linda Gorton Aragoni



Published by

Linda Aragoni

I'm passionate about helping people learn through the medium of nonfiction writing. Although I occasionally have an idea of my own, I mostly build education tools by recycling and repurposing other folks' ideas.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in: Logo

You are commenting using your account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s