White Banners entertains inoffensively

White Banners is the best sort of bad religious novel.

Its religion is so nondescript it won’t offend an ardent atheist; its story’s so entertaining the devout won’t notice the religion is tepid.


White Banners by Lloyd C. Douglas

P. F. Collier and Son., 1936, 400 p. 1936 bestseller #6. My grade: B.


A woman selling apples knocks on Paul and Marcia Ward’s door one snowy afternoon. Marcia buys an apple from her, gives her a meal, learns she’s just been released from the hospital after having a child.

Hannah feels as sorry for Marcia as Marcia feels for her, though for different reasons.

Hannah talks Paul Ward into letting her stay as housemaid until after Marcia’s third child is born.

By the time infant Sally joins the other two children, Hannah is an indispensable part of the Ward home.

Wards are so pleased with Hannah, they overlook her peculiar belief that refusing to fight those who hurt her makes her stronger than her antagonists.

Wards also don’t inquire where Hannah goes on her days off.

The plot is complicated and, in many respects, absurd.

The Wards and Hannah’s friends are sufficiently endowed with peculiarities to make them seem human.

Lloyd C. Douglas sees that virtue is rewarded, sin is punished enough to jog repentance, and that everyone gets a chance to try living happily ever after.

© 2016 Linda Gorton Aragoni

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Linda Aragoni

I'm passionate about helping people learn through the medium of nonfiction writing. Although I occasionally have an idea of my own, I mostly build education tools by recycling and repurposing other folks' ideas.

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