Missing Tai-Pan would be bad joss

Tai-Pan is the story of six months in the life of Dirk Straun, the Tai-Pan (Chinese for supreme leader) of the European trading community in China in 1841.

The novel is as complicated as Straun himself.


Tai-Pan: A Novel of Hong Kong  by James Clavell

Atheneum, 1966. 590 pp. 1966 bestseller #8. My grade: A.


1966-08_Tai-PanStraun is scrubbed, clean-shaven, and suave in a day when men are dirty, lousy, and smelly.

He’s a devoted family man, with families by a wife in England and two mistresses in China.

A master manipulator, ruthless in pursuit of a dynasty, Straum’s respected even by those who hate him.

Once he’s secured Hong Kong for the English, Straum plans to go home leaving  his son to take over the trading firm.

Hong Kong is the key to the vast Chinese market: The mountainous, malaria-ridden island has the best harbor in the world.

Straun has many enemies, but the Brocks, father and son, are the deadliest.

Tensions between the two families mount as Straun’s son elopes with Brock’s daughter.

Straun usually keeps things under control, but sometimes joss—luck—is against him.

Tai-Pan has dozens of characters to keep straight. Chinese characters speaking pigeon English make it hard to understand the power struggles below the surface.

James Clavell’s writing and the once-again timely topic, however, will repay readers’ efforts.

© 2016 Linda Gorton Aragoni

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Linda Aragoni

I read. I write. I think. I make big ideas simple. I help teachers teach expository writing to teens and adults. In my free time, I read and review old novels.

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