Now In November is beautiful and enduring

Now in November was Josephine Winslow Johnson’s first novel. Although it didn’t become a popular bestseller, critics showered praise on the book and its author. The year following its publication, the Pulitzer committee awarded Johnson its 1935 prize for best novel, a rare achievement for a writer’s first novel.


Now in November by Josephine W. Johnson ©1934 ©1962.


Cover of 1961 edition of Now in November shows women doing farm work.Arnold Haldemarne had done well in the lumber factories through persistent hard work. Suddenly, his peace and security vanished overnight, swallowed up in the Dust Bowl and Great Depression.

Haldemarne takes his wife and three daughters back to the mortgaged farm his family had owned since the Civil War.

The Haldemarne women, Willa and daughters Kerrin, Marget, and Merle, fall in love with the land.

But as the novel’s narrator, Marget, observes, her father doesn’t see the land’s beauty, and he “hadn’t the resignation a farmer has to have.”

The family suffers one misfortune after another until there are only Mr. Haldemarne and daughters Marget and Merle left.

Despite what sounds like novel built of gloom and misery, Now in November has a lyric quality that lifts the novel beyond the doldrums.

Johnson makes even the mad Kerrin and her gloomy father individuals deserving of both pity and respect.

Their gardens are dead, but the land is beautiful.

The Haldemarnes are driven far beyond endurance, yet they endure.

©2015 Linda Gorton Aragoni


This is another in the GreatPenformances series of occasional reviews of notable novels. The cover shown above is from Now in November by Josephine W. Johnson,  afterward by Nancy Hoffman. The Feminist Press, 1991, 231 pp.

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