The Gambler visits sins of father on daughter

The Gambler is a novel about an Irish girl whose life is imperiled by her genes, her upbringing, and her own innocence.

The danger to Clodagh is moral rather than mortal—and it’s terrifying.

 After gambling with her father, Milbanke encounters Clodagh
After gambling with her father, Milbanke encounters Clodagh who begs him not to encourage her father’s gambling habit.

 

Asshlin angrily refuses to let his old friend Milbanke refuse to accept payment for his gambline debt.
Asshlin angrily refuses to let his old friend Milbanke refuse to accept payment for his gambling debt.

 


The Gambler: A Novel by Katherine Cecil Thurston

Illus. John Cameron. Toronto: Fleming H. Revell,1905. 1905 bestseller #6. Project Gutenberg ebook #33490. My grade: B+.


When Denis Asshlin is fatally injured, his daughters write their father’s school friend, James Milbanke, for help.

Asshlin’s gambling has beggared his girls.

Milbanke can send Nance to boarding school, but what can he do with 17-year-old Clodagh?

Milbanke proposes marriage.

“I suppose it is what father used to call a debt of honour,” Clodagh says.

Four unhappy years later, while her husband talks about archaeology, Clodagh meets titled society people.

She envies—and fears—them.

After Milbanke dies leaving Clodagh a comfortable income, she rejoins her high society acquaintances.

Soon Clodagh’s gambling debts are larger than her annual income.

When she looks in the mirror, Clodagh sees her father’s face.

She accepts 1000£ from Lord Deerehurst realizing it obligates her but unaware what payment he expects.

A less adept writer than Katherine Cecil Thurston couldn’t have made Clodagh more than a pretty doll.

Thurston makes her a complicated woman-child, craving love and respect but traumatized by a childhood she cannot ever outgrow.

  © 2015 Linda Gorton Aragoni

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Linda Aragoni

I'm passionate about helping people learn through the medium of nonfiction writing. Although I occasionally have an idea of my own, I mostly build education tools by recycling and repurposing other folks' ideas.

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