Bombs Land Close to Home in Dangerous Days

Mary Roberts Rinehart opens Dangerous Days with a boring dinner party hosted by an American steel manufacturer and his wife.

The year is 1916.

Europe is on the verge of destruction.

Natalie and Clayton Spencer are on the edge of domestic destruction.

WWI soldiers fire a machine gun
Machine gunners at the Battle of the Somme

Clay has brought son, Graham, into his steel business at the bottom, much to Natalie’s dismay. She wants her boy to have the best even if it destroys him.

Clay wants a woman’s love but not at the price of his moral destruction.

Clay is sure America will be in the war soon.

Graham and his father realize — though they don’t say it to each other — that Graham may escape moral destruction only by volunteering to die.

Rinehart follows the bored people around the opening chapter dinner table through to Armistice Day, revealing them to be anything but boring. She masterfully combines deft characterizations, historical episodes such as the communists’ helping American draft-dodgers escape into Mexico, and intricate plots within her main plot.

There’s a certain flag-waving bravado about the novel — all the characters but Natalie do their bit in the war — but the complexity of the characters and the realness of their confusions make this page-turner a novel you won’t soon forget.

Dangerous Days
by Mary Roberts Rinehart
1919 bestseller #4
Project Gutenberg e-book #1693
My grade: A-

© 2014 Linda Gorton Aragoni



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Linda Aragoni

I'm passionate about helping people learn through the medium of nonfiction writing. Although I occasionally have an idea of my own, I mostly build education tools by recycling and repurposing other folks' ideas.

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