The Window at the White Cat Is a Classic Mystery

revolver pointed at viewer

When Margery Fleming walks into his law office seeking help finding her father, Jack Knox falls in love.

Mr. Fleming is a successful—and reputedly criminal—state treasurer with equally criminal colleagues and opponents.

Margery goes to stay with her elderly aunts. Almost immediately, one aunt reports her pearls stolen. Then Miss Jane, the other aunt, disappears from her bedroom. Next Harry Waldron, Fleming’s aid and Margery’s finacé, has cash and sensatitve documents stolen from the aunt’s home.

Jack’s investigation finds Fleming hiding at the White Cat, a private club where politicians and their cronies hang out.

Jack gets inside the White Cat in time to discover Fleming’s body.

With his detective is scared off, Jack appeals to a reporter for help. Together they work at solving the mysteries of who murdered Fleming, who stole the pearls, and what happened to Miss Jane.

Jack has enough self-deprecating humor to make him an appealing narrator. Margery is less convincing as the female lead.

Mary Roberts Rinehart shortchanges some other characters who should have had more rounded roles. Fortunately, her skill at plotting and pacing the mystery render its deficiencies almost unnoticeable.

The Window at the White Cat
By Mary Roberts Rinehart
Triangle Books Edition, 1940
1910 bestseller # 8
Project Gutenberg EBook #34020

 Photo credit:  Revolver by blary54

 

© 2013 Linda Gorton Aragoni

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Linda Aragoni

I'm passionate about helping people learn through the medium of nonfiction writing. Although I occasionally have an idea of my own, I mostly build education tools by recycling and repurposing other folks' ideas.

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