1912 bestseller list novels set for review here

The novels on the bestseller list for 1912 will appeal to a wide range of tastes.  You may even find, as I did, that a well-written novel can make you belive their might just be something worth reading in a genre you think you dislike.

Each of the 1912 bestsellers is available to read free, courtesy of Project Gutenberg.  The links for novels making their first appearance go directly to the Project Gutenberg page for that book. If the book is making its second appearance on the bestseller list, links will take you to my review which will direct you to the download page at Project Gutenberg.

Project Gutenberg

Here’s the 1912 list, and the dates when you can expect to see the review on this blog.

  1. The Harvester by Gene Stratton Porter (second year on the bestseller list)
  2. The Street Called Straight by Basil King [Sep. 9, 2012]
  3. Their Yesterdays by Harold Bell Wright [Sep. 12, 2012]
  4. The Melting of Molly by Maria Thompson Daviess [Sep. 16, 2012]
  5. A Hoosier Chronicle by Meredith Nicholson [Sep. 19, 2012]
  6. The Winning of Barbara Worth by Harold Bell Wright (second year on the bestseller list)
  7. The Just and the Unjust by Vaughan Kester [Sep. 26, 2012]
  8. The Net by Rex Beach [Sep. 30, 2012]
  9. Tante by Anne Douglas Sedgwick [Oct. 3, 2012]
  10. Fran by J. Breckenridge Ellis [Oct. 7, 2012]
© 2012 Linda Gorton Aragoni
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Linda Aragoni

I read. I write. I think. I make big ideas simple. I help teachers teach expository writing to teens and adults. In my free time, I read and review old novels.

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