Selfishness Bred by The Sheltered Life

In The Sheltered Life, Ellen Glasgow tells a story about a girl who grows up in the early 1900s “without coming in touch with the world.”

When Jenny Blair Archbald scrapes her knees roller skating, Eva Birdsong’s laundress, Memoria, patches her up. George Birdsong, Eva’s handsome husband, swears he won’t tell Jenny’s mother she was in the colored section of town if she won’t say he was at Memoria’s house.

As she grows into her teens, Jenny has no interest in boys her own age. She adores Eva Birdsong while fantasizing about Eva’s husband.

Victorian style American home
What lies behind Victorian facade?

Eva knows all about George’s weakness for women, but insists he loves her. He does care enough to try to protect her from being confronted by evidence of her affairs.

Weakened by the emotional stress of keeping up appearances, Eva is despondent after “female surgery.” George takes her away to recuperate.

Jenny is young and pretty, but she’s not innocent, only naive. Her sheltered life has kept her from knowing the destructiveness of selfishness.

When the Birdsongs return, Jenny throws herself in George’s way. The results are disastrous.

In the final chapter, Jenny sees her motives stripped bare, while her family clings to the deception that she’s young and innocent.

The Sheltered Life
Ellen Glasgow
Doubleday, Doran, 1932
395 pages
1932 Bestseller #5
My Grade: B+
 

Photo credit: “Victorian home”  uploaded by andrewatla

© 2012 Linda Gorton Aragoni
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Linda Aragoni

I read. I write. I think. I make big ideas simple. I help teachers teach expository writing to teens and adults. In my free time, I read and review old novels.

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