Re-Creation of Brian Kent: Short and Overly Sweet

The Re-Creation of Brian Kent is a syrupy, sentimental novel about how Auntie Sue, a retired schoolteacher, helps a writer-turned-bank-robber become a writer again.

 


When small boat occupied by a drunken man washes up on the river bank by Auntie Sue’s Ozarks home, the spunky spinster sees  in him the son she’d always wanted. Even when she learns Brian Kent is  wanted for a bank robbery that included her own money, she is determined to rescue him.

Dried out, literally and metaphorically, Brian stays on with Auntie Sue, clearing trees for cropland and writing  a book.

When the book is done, Auntie Sue summons a girl she knows who can prepare a typewritten manuscript from  Brian’s handwritten draft. They fall in love, and after appropriate trials, the novel ends at the altar.

Because Auntie Sue is an artificial character around whom any plot will be implausible, Harold Bell Wright’s novel feels like a sermon. The sermon is, in Auntie Sue’s words, “Before you can DO anything that is worth doing, you must be something.”

Fortunately, the novel is short so you won’t  get sugar overdose.

The Re-Creation of Brian Kent
By Harold Bell Wright
1920 Bestseller #3
Project Gutenberg ebook #3625

Photo “Early Morning on the Buffalo” by OakleyOriginals shared under Creative Commons License.

©2010 Linda Gorton Aragoni

Project Gutenberg

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Linda Aragoni

I read. I write. I think. I make big ideas simple. I help teachers teach expository writing to teens and adults. In my free time, I read and review old novels.

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