Kingsblood Royal is timeless but irritating

About 70 pages into Kingsblood Royal, Sinclair Lewis throws a bombshell into his boring characters’ boring lives—and the rest of the book is a real page-turner.

Capt. Neil Kingsblood has come home from World War II to a comfortable, suburban, middle-America life. Neil’s father sets him to chasing down his ancestors. Neil discovers his father’s forebears were ordinary yeomen, not aristocrats as his father had hoped.

He decides to look up his mother’s French ancestors.

The state historical society supplies copies of a letter by Xavier Pic, one of Neil’s ancestors who described himself as “a full-blooded Negro from Martinique.” That ancestry makes Neil a Negro by 1940s law most places in the US.

Should he keep quiet for the sake of his family or reveal his findings?

To help him decide, Neil makes it his business to meet Negroes and find out what it is like to be “colored.”

Kingsblood Royal demonstrates that prejudice arises from fear. While making that point, however, Lewis continually makes snide remarks about his white characters, ridiculing their intelligence, their perceptivity, their motives. After a while, the comments become irritating.

Even in race relations, few things are as black-and-white as Lewis makes them.

Kingsblood Royal
By Sinclair Lewis
Random House, 1947
348 pages
#8 on the 1947 bestseller list
My Grade: B
© 2007 Linda Gorton Aragoni
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Linda Aragoni

I read. I write. I think. I make big ideas simple. I help teachers teach expository writing to teens and adults. In my free time, I read and review old novels.

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